The Conestogo Iron Bridge

The Iron Bridge over the Conestogo River, looking south towards Waterloo

The “Iron Bridge” is a single lane bridge spanning the Conestogo River about a half kilometer up stream from where the Conestogo meets the Grand River. I’m sure there is a history of this bridge somewhere, but I wasn’t able to find it.

The Township of Woolwich has been pretty non-committal about keeping it in good condition. For the past few years the surface of the bridge has been very rough, consisting of asphalt pavement over a layer of old planks (I think). Vehicles crossing the bridge must do so very slowly.

Searching for a history of the bridge is complicated by the fact that there appears to be (or was?) an “iron bridge” over the Conestoga River in Lancaster County Pennsylvania.

If you know anything about the history of the bridge, or where information can be found, please leave a comment.

This photo was taken with my Blackberry Bold, so it is not the clearest or sharpest pic in the world. But it has a nice soft hazy look, appropriate for the very hot day that it was.


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Kate says:

Scroll down to the section on “Spanning the Generations: A Study of Old Bridges in Waterloo Region”. Phase III is about the 12 steel truss bridges in the region.


Rick says:

I will be adding other images of Conestogo over the next few months.

Rick says:

I am Rick Hendershot. One of my sons is Andrew –

kirk says:

are u Andrew a Hendershot?

kirk says:

Looked that way when i lived in Conestogo 30 yrs ago too! would love pictures of Conestogo if u can get them of the old mills in town or that grown over road from the golf course to the back end of Conestogo

Rick says:

Hi Andrew. Thanks for the comment. I’m going to take a shot and guess your dad would be Dave? We played slow-pitch together, back those 30 or so years ago.

Andrew says:

I’m can’t comment on the historical significance of this bridge but I can say it looks the exact same as it did 30 years ago when I grew up in this town. I remember how often the connecting road would flood over in the spring, and my father’s insistence on driving through it. For a six year old it was absolutely terrifying.